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Sat, Dec

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Interim leader of the Independent Liberal Party (ILP) Jack Warner made his first appearance yesterday in the lawsuit brought against him by Imamuddin Baksh, managing director of Graphix Advantage Ltd, over money owed to him for work done during the 2010 Fifa Under-17 Women’s World Cup.

Baksh claims the former national security minister, in his capacity as special adviser to the T&T Football Federation (TTFF) and chairman of the Local Organising Committee (LOC) for the event, failed to pay the $1.2 million he owed Graphix Advantage Ltd. Warner did not appear in court at the first hearing of the case in April and High Court judge Frank Seepersad ordered him to be present when the case was called again.

Yesterday Warner, who was accompanied by his security guards, appeared in the San Fernando High Court for a status hearing. His lawyer, Attorney Om Lalla, instructed by Dereck Balliram, told the court the defence had filed all its witness statements and documents. An application was made to have the LOC for 2010 Fifa Under-17 Women’s World Cup made a party to the proceedings. Seepersad granted it and ordered LOC to be served with notice to join the proceedings.

The case was adjourned to Monday for both parties to file statements and documents. As Warner left the San Fernando High Court yesterday he was greeted with cheers and applause by onlookers waiting outside the Magistrates Court, opposite the High Court. Shouts of “look the next Prime Minister, Jack, Tabaquite is yours and Jack we love you,” were heard as Warner walked to his car.

Warner stopped, waved to onlookers and shouted: “If you can’t go to Point Fortin tonight (last night), you could listen.” He was referring to his political meeting last night in Point Fortin. Baksh, in his lawsuit, claims Warner contracted his company to print and install signs at all national stadiums locally when Fifa’s 2010 Under-17 Women’s World Cup was held.

Warner was the special adviser to the TTFF at the time and chairman of the LOC of Fifa. The businessman claimed he was paid only $98,555 and outstanding balance of $1,262,413.19, was yet to be paid. He is seeking interest on the outstanding balance.