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18
Wed, May

Quesi Weston, Dwight Pope,Tevin Peters, and Deon O'Garro
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Wiley College men's soccer players Quesi Weston (SO/Palo Seco, Trinidad&Tobago) and Dwight Pope (SO/Trinidad and Tobago)'s relationship started long before they put on the purple Wildcat uniform.

"We grew up in the same neighborhood and village in Palo Seco, Trinidad and Tobago," Weston said. "We went to the same school and have played soccer together for at least three years."

Weston, Tevin Peters, Deon O'Garro (SO/Trinidad and Tobago) and Pope all grew up in Trinidad and Tobago and continue to share a bond on the Wildcat soccer team.

"We consider each other family," Weston said about his relationship with Pope. "He has been to my house and I've been to his house."

"Every evening, Weston and I would come out and play soccer," Pope said. "We have a great bond."

Peters and O'Garro both grew up in Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago. Peters attended the same high school as Weston and Pope at Shiva Boys Hindu College. O'Garro went to a rival high school at Chaguanas North Secondary. Peters said O'Garro was a tough competitor but is glad to have him as a teammate.

"We had a friendly rivalry," Peters said. "On the soccer field we would go after each other. After it, we would keep the brotherhood together."

O'Garro said every game his school played against Weston, Peters and Pope was always a battle.

"They were tough competitors," O'Garro said. "It was always back and forth. It was never easy."

All four players are starters for the Wildcats and played key roles in Wiley College's first 3-0 start in school history. Weston said playing together in Trinidad and Tobago has allowed them to have good chemistry as Wildcats.

"We are from the same place and speak the same language," Weston said. "We play together and know each other's role. We know each other from top to bottom."

Though they played in Trinidad, each person made an individual decision to come to Wiley. Peters said all four of them bring something different to the field.

"We know each other's strengths and weaknesses," Peters said. "We know how to play the ball to someone and how they want to receive the ball. It makes connecting with each other in the game much easier."

Pope said he has a lot of respect for O'Garro after playing against him in high school and with him at Wiley College. He is a fan of O'Garro's quickness and intelligence.

Peters' and O'Garro's hometown has recently become a hot bed for crime. Peters and O'Garro hope that their success at Wiley can be a good example to their community.

"When they see youth like us doing things like this, it brings positive impact to the community," O'Garro said. "They see we are going out there and making something of ourselves. It opens opportunities for people to do the same thing."

Weston wants to represent both Wiley College and his home country the best he can.

"There's the saying never forget where you come from," Weston said. "We are trying to win a ring. We are trying to bring Wiley to its highest level in soccer."